Summer Safety: Staying Aware of Transportation Dangers for Children

Posted by on May 27, 2016

Many people find summer to be the most exciting time of year. The weather has warmed up, the water is just right, and school is officially out. Due to a multitude of circumstances, however, the summer months can quickly bring newfound dangers to our families’ everyday commute. Many families, especially those who have children with special needs, use the summer to spend quality time with one another. It is important that when travelling with our families that we remain aware of potential accidents, and be aware of transportation dangers.

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Here are 3 Transportation Dangers to be Aware of This Summer:

  1. Stay Aware of Your Vehicle.

Summer heat can quickly change the way a car performs, and it is important to constantly be aware of the condition of your vehicle. One of the most common transportation dangers during the summertime can be a hot roadway and an underinflated tire. In the summer months, while families prep for a day trip or vacation, the chaos of loading the car, making sure reservations are made, and leaving on schedule can cause mom and dad to forget about the transportation danger of an underinflated tire.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that tire failure causes 11,000 crashes per year, the most common failures include tread separations, blowouts, bald and underinflated tires. Staying aware of your tire pressure, and having your tires routinely checked by a professional can mean avoiding a blowout. A blowout can easily lead to a fatal accident, or hours spent waiting in the summer heat with your children for an emergency vehicle. This is what makes a tire blowout one of the most important transportation dangers to stay aware of.

  1. Stay Aware of Other Vehicles

Between young, newly licensed drivers and out of town travelers, the roadways are guaranteed to be busier during the summer months. Always stay vigilant when it comes to the actions of the drivers around you, as they can quickly become a transportation danger.

In 2013, an average of 220 teen drivers and passengers died in traffic crashes in the U.S. during each of the year’s summer months alone – That’s a 43% increase compared to the rest of the 2013 year. The study also notes that the majority of people killed (66%) and injured (67%) in crashes involving a teen driver were people other than the teen themselves.

It can be easy for a parent to be distracted by what is going on with the children in the backseat of your car. Remember to always remain vigilant of the road during the more hectic back seat moments, and to not hesitate to pull over if at any point they become too distracting.

  1. Be Cautious of Construction.

Summer is the most popular season for road construction, which quickly makes it a transportation danger that all families should be aware of. Reduced speeds, sudden detours, and construction debris can all quickly make for a dangerous roadway.

In 2008, lack of seatbelt use was a factor in 53% of the 720 work zone fatalities occurring that year. On average, 85% of deaths in those work zones were drivers and passengers in cars, not workers. Ensuring that passengers are wearing the proper safety restraints, and that all children are properly fastened could prevent an accident from turning fatal.

E-Z-ON PRODUCTS, INC. of FLORIDA® knows just how much fun the summer months can be for you and your families. We hope that all of our friends, clients, and readers have a wonderful time enjoying the sun, and that they always remain aware of their surroundings when enjoying the summer season. With every season there are always new transportation dangers to be aware of, so please remember that there are extra precautions that can be taken when commuting long distances regardless of the season, such as modified safety harnesses and restraints for children with special needs. We hope that this summer is full of special moments for you and your family, and that we all steer clear of these transportation dangers.